Jazzy Reviews

27. Oct, 2019

My body was a shameful disaster. I was too embarrassed to go outside unless I absolutely had to. No, it was worse than that. I was too embarrassed to exist. I hunched down and inwards, trying to hide every part of me. I hated how much space I took up, because I got taller too. I was huge and hulking. I felt like everywhere I went, I was being seen and noticed in a way I didn’t want to be seen and noticed. Even now, on my very best skin days, I’m uncomfortable with people looking at my face. Eye contact makes me feel exposed.

THE GIST

Natalie is an 18-year-old girl who has just come out of school, with recently separated parents. As the quote I used indicates, she despises her appearance and has a skin disorder. She judges herself extremely harshly, which means that when problems keep piling onto her – the divorce, her first romance and friendship troubles – she can’t deal. What good could possibly come out of this?

THE JUDGEMENT

It Sounded Better in my Head was a pleasant surprise, from the aesthetics of the front cover to the relatability of the main character. While it wasn’t filled with action and adventure, it was still wonderful because of how well the characters were built, the differences between them and more.

This was also a completely different book choice to what I would normally read. It is a romantic comedy, and I don’t have any experience with romance, including in novels. However, as my first attempt at reading the genre, I adored the characters and the way the author subtly weaved humour throughout the storyline.

Natalie is extremely authentic, so much that she could be real; I recently even had a dream about meeting her. She has terrible skin, is extremely awkward, lies occasionally, has separated parents and is, of course, obsessed with the very prospect of romance. I really enjoyed how much she grew throughout the story, too – she goes from being shy and inexperienced in love, to a little more confident and more experienced.

My favourite character in It Sounded Better in my Head is, funnily enough, Lucy. She is such a supportive and kind friend of Natalie yet has her own problems; further into the story, Lucy says that she lied about something important (I won’t spoil). Her character is also the victim of Natalie’s jealousy, as she is prettier and better than her at almost everything.

To be honest, this was a difficult book to review. There is inappropriate content, however easy enough language used for a young person to understand. Therefore, I recommend It Sounded Better in my Head to readers aged 14+.

I loved this book. The author Nina Kenwood has done a fantastic job in building Natalie’s character in a fascinating way, so I will be looking out for more of her novels in the future. I give It Sounded Better in my Head 9 bookbolts out of 10.

ISBN: 9381925773910
Publisher: The Test Publishing Company

6. Jul, 2019

This is probably the hardest book I have ever reviewed – and one of the most well-written.

THE GIST

Lex's family is already complicated enough with her parents divorcing a few years back; but when Lex’s brother Ty took his life, her entire world took a drastic turn for the worse. Lex’s mother turns to alcohol and both mourn Ty's loss miserably. Lex breaks up with her boyfriend and pretends nothing is wrong; but within, she is a complete wreck. Her mother makes her see a therapist, Dave, thinking she has done her a favour. When he stops persuading her to take antidepressants and Valium, he gives her a new task in the form of a black notebook. Can Lex learn to live in the present, or will she continue to grieve the past?

THE JUDGEMENT

I don't normally read sad books, but as soon as I started The Last Time We Say Goodbye by Cynthia Hand I was completely taken. I felt emotionally attached to Lex and empathised with her pain. After reading this novel, I know that if I met her character in real life, it would be difficult to find the right words to say to her.

I discovered that a friendship’s true colours are shown in a time of need. For example, Lex’s friend Beaker wants her to be upset, so that she can be the “stellar bestie” who builds her broken friend back up. I also learned that even though grief is never-ending it is important not to give up hope for the future.

Ty had previously attempted the act with painkillers. Afterwards, Lex was committed to ensuring her brother's safety; she went around the house confiscating all deadly items - razors, bullets from guns in the garage, pills and more - and locked them up in a container.

The Last Time We Say Goodbye is a story inspired by a real event: After the last chapter Cynthia reveals her brother also committed the same terrible act on himself. After reading and knowing what it must have been like for Lex, I felt great sadness for the author. Losing family to suicide would be incredibly hard, and I hope to never have to face the same pain in my own life. The dedication to Jeff takes on a new meaning.

This book has the occasional drug or sexual reference, and the central theme is emotionally draining and confronting. It takes a mature reader to empathise with what Lex is going through. Therefore, I recommend it to teenagers, aged 13+

Only the most amazing book would make me emotional and this novel certainly achieved just that. It was realistic and heartbreaking. I give The Last Time We Say Goodbye five bookbolts out of five.

ISBN: 978-0-7322-9900-2
PUBLISHER: HarperCollinsPublishers
 Australia Pty Limited

30. Apr, 2019

Papa says some of the trees are a thousand years old. They were here before anyone alive now was born, even the Queen, even before the Alchemist and the Sorceress bound time to blood and metal – if there ever was such a time. These trees will be standing long after we’re gone. Yet they aren’t predators like wolves or people. The roots beneath my feet don’t live for centuries by causing other plants to shrivel and turn gray. And their time cannot be bled from them.

If only we were more like trees.


THE GIST

Imagine a time where blood is life’s currency. Where you can survive for hundreds of years – or die in your 20’s.

17-year-old Jules Ember and her father lead miserable lives; they exist in a world where blood is money. The Gerlings rule, outliving others by melting blood coins into their drinks. Rent is payed through these coins and Jules and her father are behind on rent. In an attempt to escape the relentless assault of poverty, Jules ignores her father’s warning and seeks work at Everless, the Gerlings’ palace. Jules discovers their merciless, greedy ways and uncovers some truths about herself.

THE JUDGEMENT

Everless is an intense dystopian novel that keeps you gripped until the last page. I was entranced by Sara Holland’s style of writing, particularly the way she weaves detail into the story. It made Everless a lot more enjoyable and painted vivid imagery  inside my mind.

One of the things I most admire about Everless is the way that while the story is fantasy, the characters themselves are realistic. Jules and her father suffer terrible things through the gateway of penury and the reason Jules goes to Everless is to avoid these. Her emotions are genuine and her experiences are authentic.

It’s terrible to think blood could be a currency –  I can’t imagine the fear I would feel before having blood extracted from me and would find it hard not to physically express my disgust. This same horror is included in the story. Jules hates the Gerlings for the same reasons I would, but treats them with kindness because of certain consequences if she didn’t.

My favourite character in Everless is, surprisingly, Liam Gerling. For the duration of the book, I found him interesting to read about and anticipated his future actions. I also enjoyed the fairytale-type stories of the Alchemist and Sorceress – the original tale is just as suspenseful as Everless itself.

Everless doesn’t have extreme violence or language, but to understand the concept of the story takes maturity. There are a couple of sad scenes, as well. Therefore, I recommend Everless to readers aged 12+

Everless is the first of a two-part series. The second instalment is called Evermore and is the epic conclusion to the story. Seeing as the end of the first was a cliff-hanger, I picked up the second right after I finished! I thoroughly enjoyed this novel and read it twice to get a full understanding of it. I give Everless four-and-a-half book-bolts out of five.

ISBN: 978 1 40834 915 1
Publisher: The Watts Publishing Group

14. Feb, 2019

"Richard, what are you doing?" Mom says, horrified. It's one thing to see the weapons laid out. It's another thing to see them being loaded.

"Protecting my family." The pounding on the back door is more frantic than ever.

"Let's not jump to conclusions," Mom says, her voice quivering.

But Dad is single-minded. He straps on his Kevlar vest. "Get everyone into the safe room."

THE GIST

In the midst of a horrifying drought, 16 year-old Alyssa Morrow's life is turned up-side-down from "The Tap-Out". With water a rare commodity and her small Californian town rife with violence and crime, Alyssa is forced out of her house. To avoid death by dehydration, she hits the road with her brother and the "freak" who lives next door. Picking up strangers on the way and watching the thirst bring out the worst in people, two questions remain; how long can they survive without water and where can they find it?

THE JUDGEMENT

I discovered Dry in the YA section of my local bookshop, its fire-red cover drawing me in.

Dry is split into many perspectives; those of Alyssa, Kelton, Garrett, Henry and Jacqui. They are pictured on a nerve-racking car journey during The Tap-Out. There are also unique "snapshots" given as side-stories, adding a greater personal dimension to the disaster.

I loved how much the characters grew to like each other. For example, upon meeting the rebellious teen Jacqui, Alyssa and her comrades were unsure of her. However, with time their trust increased in her. Crisis can sometimes bring out the best in people, along with the worst.

I enjoyed Dry because of the plausibility of the situation happening in real life. I was delighted by the way the tone constantly changed throughout the story; there were nail-biting scenes, sad moments and humorous parts.

At the end, it was revealed that the authors are adapting Dry into a movie. I can't wait to see it on the big screen and hope it lives up to the novel! I will definitely be looking out for more of the Shustermans' novels and have already added the famous Scythe to my reading list.

Dry features fear, desperation and raw emotion. It is violent and shows what humans will do for the bare necessities of life. There is a scene resulting in the death of a character, which I found traumatic. Therefore, I recommend Dry to readers aged 13+

I absolutely loved Dry and read it late into the night. Even after I had finished, I flicked back to the start and read it again. The writing style isn't too complicated and I felt like I could relate to the characters. I give Dry five bookbolts out of five.

Publisher:Walker Books Ltd
ISBN:978-1-4063-8685-1

8. Jan, 2019

I knew about making people laugh, but that was hard among those who didn't know me and my little problems, who saw the saliva at the corner of my mouth and straightaway thought I must be a halfwit. I wondered what I would choose if the fairy godmother who went AWOL at my birth turned up to make amends. Okay, Jacob, she'd say, what's it going to be, normal legs or a mouth that doesn't dribble from one corner?

THE GIST

Jacob O'Leary of Palmerston is forced to live with cerebral palsy and is desperately waiting for a chance to prove himself. When livestock are murdered in his small Australian town, a newcomer is unfairly blamed and Jacob seizes the moment to fight for justice. Will he solve the Palmerston case, or fail and be forever ridiculed?

THE JUDGEMENT

Upon looking at the front cover of The Beauty is in the Walking, I immediately recognised the author's name. James Moloney is known for stories such as The Book of Lies and Bridget: A New Australian, both which I read as a 'tween. I was keen to see how he would approach a YA novel.

James Moloney's writing style is descriptive and emotional. His choice to put Jacob in the first person made it easy for the reader to relate to and barrack for him. It allowed me a window into his thoughts.

Before I read The Beauty is in the Walking, I had limited knowledge on what cerebral palsy was. Jacob reveals how hard it is to deal with his social life and mental state. He details the constant pain he endures and his jealousy of his athletic older brother, Tyke.

Jacob's adoration of Amy is central to the story. He can't stop thinking of her when he is studying for his Year 12 exams and is constantly dreaming up plans to meet up. Jacob feels like his cerebral palsy is holding him back from love and this makes him try harder than ever to win Amy over.

Bullying has followed Jacob his entire life. When a cruel teenager confronts Jacob in a bathroom, he remains silent, scared and furious. Later on, he gives the same bully an inspiring speech.

Jacob is full to the brim with problems and a war is constantly raging within his head. He battles family, love, the Palmerston case, discrimination, exams, social struggles and more. The overlapping problems in The Beauty is in the Walking create a chaotic sense that lasts until the story's end.

Jacob is understandably tormented and the reader needs to be at the emotional age to empathise with him. Because of this, I recommend The Beauty is in the Walking to readers aged 12+

This is an entertaining and inspirational read and I admired how many obstacles Jacob overcomes. He experiences great personal growth and doesn't give up on his fight for righteousness.

I give The Beauty is in the Walking four-and-a-half bookbolts out of five.

Publisher: Harper CollinsPublishers Pty Limited
ISBN: 978 0 7322 9994 1